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Women's Museum of California

Preserving the Past, Inspiring the Future

Second Sunday Author Series with Amy Wallen

Second Sunday Author Series with Amy Wallen

Events

Event Date:
Sunday, April 08 2018
Time:
4:30PM

What is the event about?

California and San Diego Writers, Ink 4:30-5:30 pm at the Women’s Museum, Barracks 16, Liberty Station, $5.00

This monthly series features women writers of fiction, nonfiction, memoir, poetry, and other genres who will read from or perform their work and engage in dialogues with audience members. With the commitment to bring diverse voices and a variety of stories from local and visiting authors, the series will include both published and unpublished works from writers well known, unknown, and all the places in between. 

Join us April, 8th at 4:300 PM as we welcome author Amy Wallen to the Women's Museum to discuss her book, When We Were Ghouls. When We Were Ghouls follows a family that has been dispersed around the world, a family who, like ghosts, come and go and slip through Amy’s fingers making it unclear if they were ever there.

Purchase tickets here

When Amy E. Wallen’s southern, blue-collar, peripatetic family was transferred from Ely, Nevada, to Lagos, Nigeria, she had just turned seven. From Nevada to Nigeria and on to Peru, Bolivia, and Oklahoma, the family wandered the world, living in a state of constant upheaval. When We Were Ghouls follows Wallen’s recollections of her family who, like ghosts, came and went and slipped through her fingers, rendering her memories unclear. Were they a family of grave robbers, as her memory of the pillaging of a pre-Incan grave site indicates? Are they, as the author’s mother posits, “hideous people?” Or is Wallen’s memory out of focus?

In this quick-paced and riveting narrative, Wallen exorcizes these haunted memories to clarify the nature of her family and, by extension, her own character. Plumbing the slipperiness of memory and confronting what it means to be a “good” human, When We Were Ghouls links the fear of loss and mortality to childhood ideas of permanence. It is a story about family, surely, but it is also a representation of how a combination of innocence and denial can cause us to neglect our most precious earthly treasures: not just our children but theartifacts of humanity and humanity itself.